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New Series Helps Sift Through Research Base on Health Reform Issues

photo of health reform signHealth care reform is a process. It will require ongoing, creative thinking and vigorous dialogue among all stakeholders on important issues. To support this dialogue, Mathematica launched a series of briefs that highlight issues central to the process of health care reform. The series is intended to help policymakers understand the research base for the critical choices they will make in implementing the federal health reform law.

"How Does Insurance Coverage Improve Health Outcomes?" (April 2010)
Jill Bernstein, Deborah Chollet, and Stephanie Peterson
This brief synthesizes the compelling research evidence linking health insurance to good health outcomes.

"Encouraging Appropriate Use of Preventive Health Services" (May 2010)
Jill Bernstein, Deborah Chollet, and G. Gregory Peterson
This brief summarizes evidence on the benefits and cost-effectiveness of preventive health services, noting that health reform brings significant new opportunities to improve access to preventive care.

"Basing Health Care on Empirical Evidence" (May 2010)
Jill Bernstein, Deborah Chollet, and Stephanie Peterson
Federal reform embraces the development of evidence-based practice as a way to control health care costs and improve quality. This brief reviews initiatives under way to develop evidence of comparative effectiveness and put it into practice.

"Disease Management: Does It Work?" (May 2010)
Jill Bernstein, Deborah Chollet, and G. Gregory Peterson
Disease management programs seek to control health care costs by focusing on two major drivers: high-cost chronic illness and inpatient hospitalizations for acute conditions. This brief looks at the research evidence on the effectiveness of disease management programs and the role of disease management in health care reform.

"Financial Incentives for Health Care Providers and Consumers" (May 2010)
Jill Bernstein, Deborah Chollet, and Stephanie Peterson
Health reform will emphasize financial incentives for providers and consumers to promote the use of effective health services and discourage use of marginally effective or inappropriate services. This brief looks at evidence on the impacts of these financial incentives and draws lessons for policymakers.

"Medical Homes: Will They Improve Primary Care?" (June 2010)
Jill Bernstein, Deborah Chollet, Deborah Peikes, and G. Gregory Peterson
Medical homes are part of our nation’s overall efforts to reform the health care system. For decades, medical homes have been a model for coordinating health care for children, particularly those with special health care needs.This brief looks at federal and state efforts to establish medical homes and notes considerations for policymakers seeking to improve access to services and the quality of care. 

About the Authors

Jill Bernstein consults with private- and public-sector organizations on matters related to health insurance coverage, health care cost and quality, and access to care. She holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University.

Deborah Chollet, a senior fellow at Mathematica, conducts and manages research on private health insurance coverage, markets, competition, and regulation. She has a Ph.D. in economics from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University.

Deborah Peikes, a senior researcher at Mathematica, conducts research on the effectiveness of medical homes; chronic care coordination and disease management; and integrating health and employment supports for beneficiaries with severe disabilities. She has a Ph.D. in public policy from Princeton University, where she currently teaches a graduate course on program evaluation.

G. Gregory Peterson, a research analyst at Mathematica, focuses on issues related to accountable care organizations, health informatics, and chronic care improvements for Medicare beneficiaries. He has an M.P.A. in public policy from Princeton University.

Stephanie Peterson, a research analyst at Mathematica, focuses on issues related to Medicare Advantage, medical homes, and health care quality and costs. She has an M.P.P. in public policy from the College of William & Mary.