Mathematica Experts Win AEFP Award for Best Academic Paper on School Choice

Feb 27, 2015

The Association for Education Finance and Policy (AEFP), in conjunction with the Walton Family Foundation, has selected Mathematica's report "Do KIPP Schools Boost Student Achievement?" as the Best Academic Paper on School Choice and Reform 2014. Report authors Philip Gleason, Christina Clark Tuttle, Brian Gill, Ira Nichols-Barrer, and Bing-ru Teh were honored with the award at the Association for Education Finance and Policy's annual conference in Washington, DC. The paper presents findings from Mathematica's rigorous multi-year evaluation of the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) charter school network. Mathematica's report was selected for its thorough analysis and impact on public policy debates regarding school choice and reform.

AEFP Award imageThe paper, published in Education Finance and Policy, details the achievement impacts of 41 KIPP charter middle schools nationwide and reports consistently positive and statistically significant test-score effects in reading, math, science, and social studies. AEFP board members considered papers from a range of leading economics and education policy journals.

Mathematica staff are presenting at the AEFP conference on principal and teacher effectiveness, education research standards, financial aid policies, and many other topics. 


Related Projects
  • School children in classroom with teacher
    KIPP: Preparing Youth for College

    Mathematica built on its initial study of KIPP middle schools with this five-year project, designed to address the question of whether KIPP can maintain its effectiveness as the network grows. The study included an impact analysis, an implementation analysis, and a correlational analysis.

Related Publications
  • Education
    Do KIPP Schools Boost Student Achievement?

    This article measures the achievement impacts of 41 Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) charter middle schools nationwide and found consistently positive and statistically significant test-score effects in reading, math, science, and social studies.