Matt Niedzwiecki

Matthew Niedzwiecki

Researcher
Areas of Expertise
  • Quantitative Evaluation Design and Methods
  • Insurance Benefit Design
  • Section 1115 Medicaid Demonstrations
  • Homelessness and Social Determinants of Health
Topics
  • Health
  • Medicaid and CHIP
  • State Health Policy
  • Care Delivery Systems
About Matthew

Matthew Niedzwiecki’s research focuses on policy interventions to improve the health care access and outcomes of low-income people, with a focus on social determinants of health and predictive modeling to target high-needs patients.

Currently, Niedzwiecki is leading quantitative analyses that focus on the extent to which Section 1115 Medicaid demonstrations involving premium assistance affect the utilization and cost of health care among new enrollees. For a project funded by the California Health Care Foundation, he is directing a quantitative analysis that focuses on factors associated with the closure of psychiatric inpatient units in California. For an evaluation of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Comprehensive Primary Care Plus model, Niedzwiecki is leading the quantitative analysis of physician- and practice-level factors linked to the comprehensiveness of primary care. He is also leading the quantitative analysis for a study that examines academic health systems, as part of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s Comparative Health Systems Performance project.

Before joining Mathematica, Niedzwiecki was an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). At UCSF, he was also co-investigator and led the quantitative analysis for the evaluation of a Pay-for-Success program that provides permanent supportive housing for chronically homeless people with major medical needs. He also assisted in the evaluation of San Francisco County’s Whole-Person Care Pilot, which used predictive modeling to identify patients who were most likely to persist in high utilization of medical, housing, and criminal justice services in the county. In addition, Niedzwiecki directed the cost-analysis components of the evaluation of the California Community Paramedicine Pilot projects, which expanded the scope of practice for community paramedics by allowing them to engage in post-hospital discharge care, case management for frequent ambulance users, and other roles.

Niedzwiecki’s work has been published in JAMA Internal Medicine, Health Affairs, Medical Care, and JAMA Network Open. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, San Diego.