Steven Glazerman

Steven Glazerman

Senior Fellow
Areas of Expertise
  • Experimental and quasi-experimental methods for impact evaluation of social programs
  • Teacher labor markets, including teacher training, certification, and compensation
Topics
  • Education
  • Teacher and Principal Effectiveness
  • School Choice and Charters
  • Strengthening and Disseminating Research
About Steven

Steven Glazerman has expertise in methods for evaluating the impact of social programs and in teacher labor markets, including issues of teacher recruitment, professional development, alternative certification, performance measurement, and compensation. He is an expert on student achievement growth models and value added. His recent research has focused on school choice, especially consumer demand and the role of information in school choice behavior. Glazerman is the director of state and local education partnerships and also directs the Educator Impact Laboratory.

Glazerman’s early research included large-scale national impact evaluations of high-profile programs such as Teach For America and Job Corps. More recently, he was the principal investigator for federally funded national studies of preschool curriculum, teacher induction, and teacher pay. He completed an impact evaluation of the Talent Transfer Initiative, an effort to identify high value-added teachers and attract them with monetary incentives to low-performing schools. He led a five-year randomized study of the impacts of the Teacher Advancement Program in the Chicago Public Schools and was a principal investigator for a national evaluation of the Teacher Incentive Fund, in which more than 130 schools were randomly assigned to offer performance-based pay or serve in a control group. His research on school choice relates to consumer demand, modeling how individual preferences influence aggregate outcomes like enrollment patterns and segregation. He currently leads a factorial experiment to examine the impacts of different ways of presenting school profile information to parents (as in school report cards or school shopping websites).

In addition to his work in the United States, Glazerman has advised government officials and researchers in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Mexico, Ethiopia, and Tanzania through his work with the World Bank, USAID, the Millennium Challenge Corporation, and the Global Development Network. He currently is the principal investigator for a series of multi-country rigorous impact evaluations of education interventions in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Glazerman served on the Brookings Institute Task Force on Teacher Quality and as an adjunct professor of economics at Georgetown University. His work has been published in books and journals, including the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management and Education Finance and Policy, and has been quoted frequently in Education Week, and in the Washington Post, Baltimore Sun, Houston Chronicle, and the Arizona Star. He holds a Ph.D. in public policy from the University of Chicago, Harris School of Public Policy. 

Key Projects
Latest News
  • Educator Impact Lab Launch
    Mathematica Launches New Educator Impact Lab

    Mathematica launched the Educator Impact Laboratory, to help state and local education leaders measure the impact that educators have on their students, put these findings into context, and use them to improve education.

Related Case Studies
  • three ies studies graphic
    Building the Knowledge Base on Teacher Preparation and Effectiveness

    Mathematica designed and conducted three large-scale studies on the relationship between teacher preparation and effectiveness, using the most rigorous approach possible—random assignment of students to teachers from different kinds of programs—and compared student test scores to gauge teacher effectiveness.

Related Videos
  • Equal Access to Effective Teaching Forum

    Equal Access to Effective Teaching: What New Research Has to Say about the Problem and a Possible Solution. Do disadvantaged students have equal access to effective teachers? If not, can incentives be used to address the problem?