2012 and 2014 Regional Partnership Grants to Increase the Well-Being of and to Improve the Permanency Outcomes for Children Affected by Substance Abuse: Fourth Annual Report to Congress

Regional Partnership Grants Cross-Site Evaluation and Evaluation-Related Technical Assistance
Publisher: Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau
Feb 04, 2019
Authors
Mathematica Policy Research

Key Findings:

  • Providers have implementation drivers examined by the cross-site evaluation in place to deliver the “focal” EBPs, although some only partially.
  • Focal EBP providers from most grantees had overall staff competency drivers (selecting and hiring, training, and coaching staff appropriately) and organizational supports drivers (data systems and administrative supports available) in place for the focal EBPs.
  • Focal EBP providers from fewer grantees—but still a majority—had leadership in place.
  • The grantees reported challenges related to: (1) obtaining referrals, (2) enrolling participants, (3) retaining participants in EBPs and program services, and (4) recruiting and retaining project staff.

Since 2006, Congress has authorized HHS to make competitive Regional Partnership Grants (RPG) to support partnerships between child welfare agencies and organizations in substance use disorder treatment and other social service systems to improve the well-being, permanency, and safety outcomes of children who were in, or at risk of, out-of-home placement as a result of a parent’s or caregiver’s substance use disorder.

This report describes the context in which the second cohort of RPG grantees selected their evidence-based programs (EBPs), and the implementation quality of selected EBPs.  To round out understanding of the context in which RPG partnerships implemented their EBPs (and other services), it also explores challenges grantees experienced. It also presents a snapshot of participants enrolled by the third cohort of RPG grantees, funded in 2014, at an early stage of their projects.